Maria Eichhorn

Zimmerstraße 88/89, 10117 Berlin

February 8 – March 19, 2011

<i>Seekieferplatten</i>, 2011<br>maritime pine boards, wooden beams, wooden wedges, metal columns, screws, tension belts<br>dimensions variable
Seekieferplatten, 2011
maritime pine boards, wooden beams, wooden wedges, metal columns, screws, tension belts
dimensions variable
<i>Seekieferplatten</i>, 2011 (detail)<br>maritime pine boards, wooden beams, wooden wedges, metal columns, screws, tension belts<br>dimensions variable
Seekieferplatten, 2011 (detail)
maritime pine boards, wooden beams, wooden wedges, metal columns, screws, tension belts
dimensions variable
Maria Eichhorn: Zimmerstraße 88/89, 10117 Berlin. February 8 – March 19, 2011
<i>Figuren</i>, 2011<br>inkjet print on paper<br>photo: Jens Ziehe<br>351 x 343 cm
Figuren, 2011
inkjet print on paper
photo: Jens Ziehe
351 × 343 cm
Maria Eichhorn: Zimmerstraße 88/89, 10117 Berlin. February 8 – March 19, 2011

Galerie Barbara Weiss is pleased to announce the ninth solo exhibition of works by Maria Eichhorn in celebration of the twentieth anniversary of our cooperation with the artist. The show is the last to take place in our space on Zimmerstraße; the gallery will then move to a new home at Kohlfurter Straße 41–43, Berlin-Kreuzberg.

The exhibition, entitled Zimmerstrasse 88/89, 10117 Berlin, assembles five new works and groups of works by Maria Eichhorn and addresses the fact that the gallery is vacating its home on Zimmerstraße.
The street-facing windows of the gallery have been boarded up with panels of maritime pine of the sort generally used in buildings slated for demolition or renovation. The light fixtures installed under the ceilings in the darkened exhibition rooms have been removed. The gallery’s address, Zimmerstrasse 88/89, 10117 Berlin, has been painted on the wall in white on white. The application of multiple layers of white wall paint directly to the wall, a technique developed by Eichhorn, allows the text to gradually emerge into legibility. Due to its particular nature, this work by Maria Eichhorn can be produced in countless copies at any geographical address, and each instance will be tied by its specific text to the specific site. Another work, a large print of a photograph from Eichhorn’s study Figuren that examines people’s different positions and the social relationships between them, has been affixed to the wall in the gallery’s entrance area. The picture shows the gallerist and the artist walking in opposite directions (the photographs in this study were taken by Jens Ziehe). Maria Eichhorn has also developed a new multiple for the exhibition: a large broom with a wooden stick, a wooden bar and black bristles. The multiple will be produced in an unlimited number of copies.

The exhibition addresses connections and interrelations between the public space of the street and the private space of the gallery as well as between the art market and the production of art. To what extent do they shape the social space between the actors, between art dealers, artists, collectors, and the public?